Water pressure booster pump

If you’re shower feels more like a slow drip or your faucet is more like a slow leak the you probably have low water pressure.

A low water pressure issue from a static water reservoir can easily be resolved by installing a water pressure booster pump in the supply system.

Once installed, a water pressure booster pump renders water under pressure on demand as soon as flow is induced through the system. The moment a tap is opened, the flow switch activates the water pump pressure switch and the supply is boosted.
…pressure on demand.
This really is an effective and low-cost solution to frustrating low water pressure.


Two types of water pressure booster pump systems are commonly used.
• Expansion Tank
• Flow Switch

The first type makes use of a bladder inside an expansion tank. Water booster pump
The expansion tank a closed tank. The bladder is pressurized and the pump forces water into the tank on the side of the bladder. By doing this, the air inside the bladder is compressed and the water becomes pressurized.

The second type and recently the more popular pressure system, makes use of a flow switch, a water pressure regulator valve and an electric water pump connected in series. This form a much more compact unit. It is very cost effective alternative and it is rather easy to maintain. The diagram below indicates the different components and functions of this type of water pressure pump.

Water pressure booster pump
The pictures and diagram above, are of the specific unit that I have installed myself.

The supplier that we purchased our pump from, calls it a “clean water pump”.  Though I am confident that our water supply is clean, I installed a filter between my 2200 liter (580 gallon) water tank and our booster pump. I made use of a cost effective and simple filter that is commonly used in irrigation systems.

The purpose of the filter is only a precautionary measure. It is to prevent any unforeseen objects that might end up in my supply from entering through the pump into my water distribution system.

We are in the privileged position to have both grid-supply water as well as borehole water on our premises. The grid-supply was the primary installation and we only recently started to make use of borehole water.

At first, we used the borehole water for irrigation purposes only, but then because of the drought conditions, the grid supply became rather expensive. We changed over to our “own” water, by connecting our off-grid supply to the main supply of the house. Our main water use is now from borehole water stored in our water tank.

We connected our off-grid water supply in a very easy way to the main water system of the house and still have the main grid supply as back-up.

The way we went about, is as follows:
Obviously, we feed the water storage tank from the borehole. To the bottom outlet of the water storage tank, we first connected a ball cut off valve that is manually operated and then after that, an inline filter. A flexible connector piece connects the filter to the inlet of the pump. The outlet side of the pump is plumbed up to a waterline that forms part of the main (grid) supply to the main house. I basically sourced a nearby waterline feeding an outer water tap for this purpose. Between the pump outlet and the main supply connection, there is firstly another manual ball cut off valve and secondly a non-return valve installed.

The purpose of the non-return valve is to prevent the possibility that water will feed backwards from the grid supply into my off-grid supply.

Such installation allows us now to choose between which supply source we want to use. Should we choose to use the main grid-supply, we close off the manual ball valve that is installed between the water system of the house and our water booster pump outlet. The off-grid system is then completely closed off and the grid-supply is functioning. When we choose to use the borehole supply, we simply close off the main grid supply valve. We open the valve between our off-grid system and the plumbing to the house and water is then fed into the plumbing system from the off-grid water supply on demand.

We use “raw” borehole water throughout the house. We plan on adding a reverse osmosis filtration system to the supply in future.

Our off-grid water supply system is simple, easy to maintain and it was a very cost effective installation.

….before you move on, please care to leave a comment below 🙂

Copyright:
Cobus vdM / https://offgridbasics.com

 

 

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6 Comments

  1. My long term goals include living on a piece of land that I built my own houses and stuff on. I don’t necessarily want to be off grid, but similar… Anyway, I don’t fully understand all the logistics of the article, but I definitely bookmarked it for the future. Well written, informative and thorough. Explained well enough that even with my minimal knowledge, I was able to mostly understand and I figure I’ll understand the rest when the time comes. 😀

  2. Very informative article thank you.
    I am busy installing a rainwater harvesting system as well as a greywater system at my home. The only component I still need is the pump.

    I am planning on building a control circuit and incorporating a series of valves so one pump can be used to deliver both harvested water as well as gray water to where it will be used.

    I have a little bit of experience with the type of pump you prime with a compressor but I’m not a fan of them as they are a bit bulky. Or maybe I was just around older types.

    • Thanks for your comment Jean, These pumps I’m using are self prime pumps. What also helps is if you install a non return valve on the feed side of the pump. It prevents the supply to surge back and creating an air lock.
      I’m glad if you can make use the info I shared. …Cheers 😉

  3. Thanks for an informative article. I now understand a few things about water pumps. The expansion tank is the pump I see all the time. Are they more expensive that the Flow Switch? Are these pumps for DIY or would you recommend that they be installed by professionals?

    • Hi Josephine, thanks for your comment. The flow switch booster pumps are simpler in design, more compact and less expensive than the expansion type of booster pumps. It will be safest to have the installation done professionally, but if you trust your DIY skills, it is fairly easy to do it yourself. I installed my booster pump myself.
      Cheers 🙂

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